Here is the list of most of the publishers and developpers who worked for the Colecovision. I also tried to make a list of people involved in making games for this console.

PUBLISHER

Activision

Crane, Miller, and Whitehead left Atari and founded Activision in October 1979 with former music industry executive Jim Levy and venture capitalist Richard Muchmore; Kaplan soon joined the company.

Activision converted their most popular games from the Atari 2600 to the Colecovision. A total of 8 games have been released.

Beamrider, Decathlon, H.E.R.O., Keystone Kapers, Pitfall, Pitfall II : Lost Caverns, River Raid, Zenji

More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Atarisoft

Atarisoft was a brand name used by Atari, Inc in 1983 and 1984 to market video games they published for home systems made by their competitors. Each platform had a specific color attributed by Atarisoft for its game packages. For example, video games sold for the Colecovision came up in orange packages, games for the Texas Instruments TI-99/4A in yellow, games for the IBM PC in blue, and so on. Despite being in existence for less than two years, Atarisoft had a huge video game library with dozens of game versions being released for various home computers and consoles. Almost all of the Atarisoft titles were produced by third-party software companies, as Atari only developed for their own systems.

The Atarisoft label did not bear Atari's popular "fuji" logo, and the name was written in a different typeface (popularly called "Futuri Extra Bold [non-italic]") to the normal "Atari" lettering. Atarisoft was a brand mainly used on game boxes and manuals; the name that appeared on the title screen of these games was generally that of Atari, not Atarisoft.

Centipede, Defender, Galaxian, Jungle Hunt
Never released: Dig Dug, Joust, Moon Patrol, Ms Pac Man, Pac-Man

More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

CBS

CBS entered the video game market briefly, through its acquisition of Gabriel Toys (renamed CBS Toys), publishing several arcade adaptations and original titles under the name "CBS Electronics", for the Atari 2600, and other consoles and computers, also producing one of the first karaoke recording/players.

CBS Electronics also distributed all Coleco-related video game products outside of North America, including the ColecoVision. CBS later sold Gabriel Toys to View-Master, which eventually ended up as part of Mattel.

Antarctic Adventure, Buck Rogers, Bump'n Jump, Burger Time, Cabbage Patch Kids, Carnival, Cosmic Avenger, Destructor, Donkey Kong, Donkey Kong Jr., Frenzy, Front Line, Gateway to Apshai, Gorf, Jumpman Jr., Ken Uston BlackJack/Poker, LadyBug, Looping, Mouse Trap, Mr. Do!, Omega Race, Pepper II, Pitstop, Rocky, Roc'n Rope, Slither, Smurf, Smurf Paint, Space Fury, Space Panic, Subroc, Super Action Soccer, Tarzan, Time Pilot, Turbo, Venture, Victory, Wargames, Zaxxon

PUBLISHER

Coleco

Coleco is an American company founded in 1932 by Maurice Greenberg as "Connecticut Leather Company". It became a highly successful toy company in the 1980s, known for its mass-produced version of Cabbage Patch Kids dolls and its video game consoles, the Coleco Telstar and ColecoVision.

Under CEO Arnold Greenberg, the company entered the video game console business with the Telstar in 1976.

When the video game business began to implode in 1983, it seemed clear that video game consoles were being supplanted by home computers. Coleco's strategy was to introduce the Coleco Adam home computer, both as a stand-alone system and as an expansion module to the ColecoVision. This effort failed, in large part because Adams were often unreliable. The Adam flopped; Coleco withdrew from electronics early in 1985.

The Coleco company published over 50 games for their Colecovision system. Unfortunately, the catalogue showed many games that were never released.

2010 the Graphic Action Game, BC's Quest for Tires II : Grog's Revenge, Brain Strainers, Antarctic Adventure, Buck Rogers, Bump'n Jump, Burger Time, Cabbage Patch Kids, Cabbage Patch Kids : Picture Show, Carnival, Choplifter!, Congo Bongo, Cosmic Avenger, Dam Busters, Destructor, Donkey Kong, Donkey Kong Jr., Dr. Seuss : Fix-up the Mix-up Puzzler, Dukes of Hazzard, Fortune Builder, Frenzy, Front Line, Gorf, Illusions, Ken Uston BlackJack/Poker, LadyBug, Looping, Monkey Academy, Mouse Trap, Mr. Do!, Omega Race, Pepper II, Rocky, Roc'n Rope, Slither, Smurf, Smurf Paint, Spy Hunter, Star Trek, Space Fury, Space Panic, Subroc, Super Action Baseball, Super Action Football, Tapper, Tarzan, Telly Turtle, Time Pilot, Turbo, Venture, Victory, Wargames, Zaxxon

More information on Colecozone
More information on ColecoVision.dk
More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Collectorvision

Collectorvision was founded in May 2008 by Jean-François Dupuis (aka retroillucid) to publish games initially based on the work of Eduardo Mello and Daniel Bienvenu. Then Collectorvision published many games made by other homebrew programmers. They also published unreleased prototypes. J-F Dupuis plans to make a book and a virtual museum about Coleco and Colecovision.

A.E. (Programmers 3), Armageddon (Anonymous), Bomb'n Blast (Michel Louvet), Bugs'n Bots (Nicolas Campion), Burn Rubber (Dvik & Joyrex), Buster Bros/Pang (Michel Louvet), Chack'n Pop (ported by Opcode), Chess Challenger (Anonymous), Elevator Action (ported by Opcode), Ghost'n Zombies (Jean-Philippe Meola), Kobashi (Dvik & Joyrex), Lock'n Chase (Michel Louvet), Lord of the Dungeon (Rexford Ayers Battenberg), Mario Bros. (Anonymous), Mindwalls (Nicolas Campion), Mr. Chin (Anonymous), Ozma Wars (Michel Louvet), Penguin Land (Steve Bégin), Pooyan (Dvik & Joyrex), Puzzli (Michel Louvet), Pyramid Warp & Battleship Clapton II (Dvik & Joyrex), Roller Ball (ported by Opcode), Side Trak (Russ Kumro), Smurf Challenge (Jean-Philippe Meola), Starcom (Michel Louvet), The CAT SOS Game (Unknown), The Way of the Exploding Foot (Jean-Philippe Meola), Zippy Race (Dvik & Joyrex), Zombie Near (Óscar Toledo Gutiérrez)

More information on Collectorvision

PUBLISHER

Epyx

The company was founded as Automated Simulations by Jim Connelley and Jon Freeman, originally using Epyx as a brand name for action-oriented games before renaming the company to match in 1983.

The company had a huge success in computer games in the 80's and they published some titles on console systems.

Gateway to Apshai, Jumpman Junior, Pitstop

More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Fisher-Price

Fisher-Price is an American company that produces toys for infants and children. Fisher-Price has been a wholly owned subsidiary of Mattel since 1993.

In the early 80's, the company released educational video games.

Dance Fantasy, Linking Logic, Logic Levels, Memory Manor

More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Imagic

Imagic was an American video game developer and publisher that developed games for the Atari 2600, Mattel Intellivision, ColecoVision, IBM PCjr, and Magnavox Odyssey in the early 1980s. It was founded in 1981 by Atari and Mattel Intellivision expatriates.

Imagic was similar to Activision in many ways; they used a distinctive and easily recognizable style of cartridge housing (which included the company name embossed in the plastic), offered patches to players who sent in proof of a high score, and were renowned for featuring a high standard of audiovisual design in their games.

Dragonfire, Fathom, Moonsweeper, Nova Blast, Tournament Tennis, Wing War

More inofrmation on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Interphase

Interphase Technologies was a Canadian company. It was reportedly a one-man operation, with all the games being programmed by Stephen Willey.

Aquattack, Blockade Runner, Sewer Sam, Squish'Em featuring Sam

 

PUBLISHER

Microfun

Micro Fun was a division of MicroLab, Inc.

The Heist, Miner 2049er, One-on-One

PUBLISHER/DEVELOPER

Opcode

Eduardo Mello (aka opcode) created Opcode Games in 2003 (formerly Coin-Op Games). He developed many games for the Colecovision. A lot of them are ports of Sega SG-1000 titles.

Some of Opcode’s games were sold as prototypes on eBay as Eduardo judged that they were not good enough to be published at a "large" scale (Exerion, Galaga, Comic Bakery). Several Opcode’s games were published by Team Pixelboy and Collectorvision.

Opcode developed the Super Game Module which is an extension that enhances the Colecovision console and that is used to play specific SGM games.

Sky Jaguar, Magical Tree, Space Invaders Collection, Yie Ar Kung Fu, Road Fighter, Pac-Man Collection

Games published by other publishers:

Penguin Land (Collectorvision), Circus Charlie (Team Pixelboy), Star Force (Team Pixelboy), Ninja Princess (Team Pixelboy), Golgo 13 (Team Pixelboy), Bank Panic (Team Pixelboy), Chack’n Pop (Collectorvision), Elevator Action (Collectorvision), Konami’s Ping Pong (Team Pixelboy), Roller Ball (Collectorvision), Thexder-SGM (Team Pixelboy), Kings Valley-SGM (Team Pixelboy), Wonder Boy (Team Pixelboy), Mopiranger (Team Pixelboy)

More information on Opcode Games

PUBLISHER

Parker Brothers

Parker Brothers is an American toy and game manufacturer and brand. Since 1883, the company has published more than 1,800 games. Parker Brothers is currently a subsidiary of Hasbro.

Parker Brothers produced video games for various systems during the early 1980s, with home ports of many popular arcade games like Sega's Frogger and Gottlieb's Q*Bert.

Frogger, Frogger II : Threeedeep !, Gyruss, James Bond 007, Montezuma's Revenge, Mr. Do!'s Castle, Popeye, Q*Bert, Q*Bert's Qubes, Star Wars : The Arcade Game, Super Cobra, Tutankham

Norman Sippel in the FAQ says : There are two boxes used by Parker Bros. One is the typical "boxed" game with two box parts that open up to reveal the game and instructions. The other is a clone of the standard Coleco box with Parker Bros. written on it instead.
Parker Bros. used the same serial numbers for their games around the world with one exception--for foreign release, a "A" was added to the serial number of the game.

More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Sega

Sega made very popular arcade games in the early 1980s like Carnival and Zaxxon. They sold their rights to other publishers for many Colecovision games. Only one Colecovision game was directly published by the company.

Up 'n Down

PUBLISHER

Sierra on Line

Sierra On-Line was an American video-game developer and publisher founded in 1979 as On-Line Systems by Ken and Roberta Williams.

BC's Quest of Tires, Learning with Leeper, Oil's Well, Sammy Lightfoot, Threshold, Wiz Math : Wizard of Id's

More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Spectravideo

Spectravideo, or SVI, was a U.S. computer company founded in 1981 as "SpectraVision" by Harry Fox and Alex Weiss as a distributor of computer games, contracting external developers to write the software.

Their main products were gaming cartridges for the Atari 2600 VCS, Colecovision and Commodore VIC-20. They also made the world's first ergonomic joystick, the Quickshot. In late 1982 the company was renamed to Spectravideo.

Flipper Slipper, Frantic Freddy, Sector Alpha, Spectron, Super Cross Force

More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Sunrise Software

Sunrise Software was a small-scale producer and publisher of games for the Atari and Colecovision consoles and the Commodore 64 home computer.

Campaign '84, Gust Buster, Mountain King, Quest for Quintana Roo, Rolloverture

PUBLISHER

Team Pixelboy

Luc Miron (aka Pixelboy) created Team Pixelboy in 2009 after having worked with Eduardo Mello at Opcode Games. Team Pixelboy plans to develop a new programming language for the Colecovision: BasicVision.

Gulkave (ported by Opcode), Girl’s Garden (ported by Bruce Tomlin), Peek-a-boo (by Daniel Vik & Vincent van Dam), Pitfall II Arcade (ported by Stephen Seehorn), Track & Field (ported by Opcode), Destructor S.C.E. (patched by Stephen Seehorn), Circus Charlie (ported by Opcode), Star Force (ported by Opcode), Ninja Princess (ported by Opcode), Golgo 13 (ported by Opcode), Bank Panic (ported by Opcode), Konami’s Ping Pong (ported by Opcode), Super Action Soccer (patched by Luc Miron), Wonder Boy (ported by Opcode), Mopiranger (ported by Opcode), Princess Quest (Óscar Toledo Gutiérrez), Quest of the Golden Chalice (ported by Mystery Man), Dragon’s Lair-SGM (ported by Mystery Man), Zaxxon-SGM (ported by Mystery Man), King’s Valley-SGM (ported by Opcode), Thexder-SGM (ported by Opcode)

More information on Team Pixelboy

PUBLISHER

Telegames

Telegames was well known for supporting not just modern game systems but also classic game systems, after they've been abandoned by its manufacturer. Effective September 2004 though, Telegames, Inc. ceased support for all "classic" and "orphaned" video game systems and software in order to support only modern consoles.

Alcazar: The Forgotten Fortress, Amazing Bumpman, Boulder Dash, Cosmic Crisis, Fathom, Kung Fu Superkicks, Motocross Racer, Rock 'N' Bolt, Skiing, Strike It!, Tank Wars, Tournament Tennis

More information on Wikipedia

PUBLISHER

Xonox

Xonox, based in Minnesota, started developing Atari cartridges during the height of the 2600's popularity. They contributed many high quality games available for the early platforms. Xonox capitalized on the novelty and perceived value of "double-ender" cartridges. These could be inserted into the console on one of the two ends, each end offering a different game.

Artillery Duel, Artillery Duel/Chuck Norris Superkicks, Chuck Norris Superkicks, It's Only Rock n' Roll, Motocross Racer, Motocross Racer/Tomarc the Barbarian, Robin Hood, Robin Hood/Sir Lancelot, Sir Lancelot

More information on Wikipedia

DEVELOPER

4D Interactive Systems

4D Interactive Systems was a company based in St. Paul, Minnesota, United States, started by Dungeons & Dragons co-creator Dave Arneson and/or Dan Nicholson. It was incorporated on February 14, 1978.

Colecovision games :

Pepper II (US Publisher: Coleco)
Spy Hunter (US Publisher: Coleco)
Subroc (US Publisher: Coleco)
Tarzan (US Publisher: Coleco)
Zaxxon (US Publisher: Coleco)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Action Graphics, Inc.

Action Graphics, Inc. was a development company based in South Barrington, Illinois, United States (originally Cary), spun off of Bally to develop games for the Bally Astrocade. It was headed by Bob Ogdon, software manager for Dave Nutting Associates. It was incorporated on September 18, 1981, and folded in 1985.
Ogdon went on to found Ogdon Micro Design. Former Action Graphics employees Elaine Hodgson and Richard Ditton went on to start Incredible Technologies, which found great success with Golden Tee Golf.

Colecovision games :

The Activision Decathlon (US Publisher: Activision)
Artillery Duel (US Publisher: Xonox)
Beamrider (US Publisher: Activision)
Pitfall! (US Publisher: Activision) Credited as "The Game Weavers" in the manual
Pitstop (US/CA Publisher: Coleco)
Zenji (US Publisher: Activision)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Adrenalin Entertainment / Western Technologies

Adrenalin Entertainment was, for much of the 1990s, the name of Western Technologies, Inc.'s software division. Started in 1978 and headed by Jay Smith, Western also designed and developed electronic toys and consumer electronics products. Video game hardware designed by Western includes the Vectrex game system, the Menacer gun for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis, and the SegaDev board used for Sega Mega Drive/Genesis development.
In February 1997, Western and certain assets and liabilities of Jay Smith's sole proprietorship Smith Engineering were acquired by Wanderlust Interactive, Inc. Wanderlust was renamed Adrenalin Interactive, Inc. on May 14, 1998. In December 1999, Adrenalin Interactive acquired McGlen Micro, Inc. through a reverse merger, forming McGlen Internet Group, Inc. Western's operations were discontinued soon after.

Western operated a Florida office that was involved in the development of video games and robotic toys and moved into industrial automation after the so-called "Video Game Crash." Through a buyout by employees and a real estate developer, it broke off and became Western Technologies Automation in 1985.
Pacific Softscape and Sennari were started by former employees.

Colecovision game :

Q*bert (US/CA Publisher: Parker Brothers)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Cheshire Engineering

Pasadena, California-based company started in 1982 by former APh Technological Consultants programmers after a dispute over profits from developing the M Network games for Mattel.
After the North American "crash," Cheshire got out of video games, but is still in business today as a consulting firm.

Colecovision games :

Cloud Nine (unreleased) (Activision)
Rocketball (unreleased) (Activision)
Steamroller (unreleased) (Activision)
Towerquest (unreleased) (Activision)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Computer Magic, Ltd.

Computer Magic, Ltd. was a Long Island, New York, United States-based software house incorporated on February 26, 1980, and dissolved on September 28, 1994. It is not to be confused with the Atari 2600 third-party publisher Computer Magic Inc. (aka CommaVid) and is probably not to be confused with the publisher of Volcano for the ZX Spectrum.
Mark Thompson worked on ColecoVision games at Computer Magic.

Colecovision games :

Pogoman (unreleased) (Computer Magic)
Robin Hood (US Publisher: Xonox)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Davis & Nussrallah & Associates Inc

Davis & Nussrallah & Associates Inc was a Texas-based company incorporated on April 7, 1983.

Colecovision games :

Frenzy (US Publisher: Coleco)
Super Action Football (US Publisher: Coleco)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Emag Software & Engineering Inc.

Emag Software & Engineering Inc. appears to be/have been a Taiwanese maker of PC board and peripheral components.

It's Only Rock 'n Roll (US Publisher: Xonox)
Slurpy (US Publisher: Xonox)
Word Feud (US Publisher: Xonox)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Gordon Martin & Associates

Gordon Martin, along with Gary Littleton and others at GMA, were on the team at Texas Instruments that designed the ColecoVision.

Colecovision games :

Cosmic Avenger (under subcontract with Product Guild) (US Publisher: Coleco). It has also been claimed that Nuvatec developed this.
Roc 'n Rope (under subcontract with Product Guild) (US Publisher: Coleco)
Super Action Baseball (under subcontract with Product Guild) (US/CA Publisher: Coleco)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Innoventions

Colecovision games :

Rocky Super Action Boxing (US Publisher: Coleco)
Smurf Paint 'n' Play Workshop (US Publisher: Coleco; EU Publisher: CBS Electronics)
WarGames (US Publisher: Coleco; EU Publisher: CBS Electronics)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

James Wickstead Design Associates

Design and engineering company started in 1968. Based in Cedar Knolls, New Jersey.

Colecovision games :

Frogger (US Publisher: Parker Brothers)
Q*bert's Qubes (US Publisher: Coleco)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Nice Ideas

Based in le parc international d'activités de Valbonne Sophia Antipolis, a technology park near the south coast of France, Nice Ideas was originally started in February 1983 as Mattel Electronics' French office, established to develop Intellivision and Colecovision games that would appeal to European sensibilities. Half the programmers were recruited in London, the other in Paris.
Mattel was unable to shut down the French office as it had the rest of Mattel Electronics due to French labor laws and economic incentives taken advantage of to move into Valbonne Sophia Antipolis. Director Tim Scanlon eventually found investors so the division could become independent. Renamed Nice Ideas, the company stayed in business a couple more years.

Colecovision games :

Bump 'n' Jump (US Publisher: Coleco)
BurgerTime (US Publisher: Coleco)
Fireman (unreleased) (Coleco)
Illusions (US Publisher: Coleco)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Nuvatec

Defunct high-tech product development consulting/manufacturing firm based in Downer's Grove, Illinois, United States. Founded by five entrepreneurs and owned by Brunswick for a while. Contributed to the development of the ColecoVision system as well as developed games. Developed the operating system and bowling games for Brunswick's Bowlervision system.

Colecovision games :

2010: The Graphic Action Game (US Publisher: Coleco)
Cat Scheduled Oil Sampling Game, The (US Publisher: Caterpillar). Promo cartridge used exclusively at Caterpillar Tractor dealerships.
Cosmic Avenger (US Publisher: Coleco). It has also been claimed that Gordon Martin & Associates developed this.
Front Line (US Publisher: Coleco; UK/EU Publisher: CBS Electronics)
Gorf (US Publisher: Coleco; UK/EU Publisher: CBS Electronics)
LadyBug (US Publisher: Coleco)
Looping (US Publisher: Coleco; UK/EU Publisher: CBS Electronics)
Slither (US Publisher: Coleco; UK/EU Publisher: CBS Electronics)
Tac-Scan (unreleased) (Coleco)
Time Pilot (US Publisher: Coleco; UK/EU Publisher: CBS Electronics)
Turbo (US Publisher: Coleco)
Victory (US Publisher: Coleco; UK/EU Publisher: CBS Electronics)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

On-Time Software Inc.

On-Time Software Inc. was started by four ex-Roklan employees (Paul Crowley, Joe Gaucher, Cameron Shaffer, and Jack Versun) after that company folded. It was incorporated in California on May 2, 1984, and originally based in Illinois.

Colecovision games :

James Bond 007 (US Publisher: Parker Brothers) [Paul Crowley]
Up 'n Down (US Publisher: Sega) [Paul Crowley]

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

The Softworks/Berkeley Softworks

Started in 1983 by Brian Dougherty, formerly of Mattel Electronics and Imagic, as The Softworks. Renamed Berkeley Softworks in 1985. Later became known for its GEOS operating system and was renamed yet again as GeoWorks in 1990.

Colecovision game :

H.E.R.O. (US Publisher: Activision)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Sydney Development

While Sydney only released one game on their own (Evolution), they were a major player in the Colecovision arena. Many, many games were created or translated for ColecoVision by Sydney.

Colecovision games :

River Raid
Keystone Kapers
B.C.'s Quest for Tires
B.C.'s Quest for Tires II: Grog's Revenge
Wiz Math
The Dam Busters

Source : FAQ

DEVELOPER

VSS, Inc.

VSS, Inc. ("Video Software Specialists") was a development company in Dallas, Texas, United States, started by former Apollo employees Terry Grantham, George Kokoruda, Ed Salvo, and Mike Smith. Clients included CBS Electronics, Xonox, and Wizard Video Games. It was incorporated on November 24, 1982.
Publisher Sunrise Software was VSS's sister company. Terry Grantham later started publisher/contract developer/mail-order retailer Telegames.

Colecovision games :

Amazing Bumpman (US Publisher: Telegames). Originally to be released by Sunrise Software as Number Bumper.
Campaign '84 (US Publisher: Sunrise Software)
Chuck Norris Superkicks (US Publisher: Xonox)
Gust Buster (US Publisher: Sunrise Software)
Motocross Racer (US Publisher: Xonox)
Mountain King (US Publisher: Sunrise Software)
Quest for Quintana Roo (US Publisher: Sunrise Software)
Rolloverture (US Publisher: Sunrise Software)
Sir Lancelot (US Publisher: Xonox)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

WCI Labs

Formerly the Atari NY Lab, WCI Labs was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Warner Communications formed by Steve Meyer to help design the next generation of Atari home computers. Warner later sold 78% of the company to WCI Labs management. As a result of this transaction, a new privately-held company, the Take One Company, was formed.

Colecovision game :

Dance Fantasy (US Publisher: Fisher-Price)

Source : gdri

DEVELOPER

Woodside Design Associates, Inc.

Woodside Design Associates, Inc. was a high technology think tank in Redwood City, California, United States, headed by Jessica Stevens. It was incorporated on April 2, 1981.
In 1987, Woodside sued Apple for breach of contract, claiming Apple was acquiring the company to incorporate its flat-panel display technology into a future portable Macintosh. The deal fell through after Apple chairman Steve Jobs was ousted by president John Sculley.

Colecovision game :

Space Shuttle: A Journey Into Space (unreleased) (Activision)

Source : gdri

PEOPLE

This list is neither accurate, nor complete. Here, I tried to list people who were involved in making games for the Colecovision. For homebrew people, you should go to Ole Nielsen’s excellent site colecovision.dk.

If you have information to complete/correct this list, please contact me.

Alan McNeil - Coleco - Programmer
Alan Smith
- Imagic
Arnold Hendrick - Coleco - Game design
Au Nguyen - Coleco - Programmer
B. Dennis Sustare - Coleco - Game design
Bill Groetzinger - Spinnaker
Bob Stewart - Coleco
Charles Benton - Sydney Development
Charlie Winterble - Coleco - Director of ARD
Chris Capener - Epyx
Chris Gray - Micro Fun
Chris Merkel - Atarisoft - Programmer (Defender)
Chris Oberth - Micro Fun
Chuck Lockhart - Coleco - Art design
Clinton Ballard - Imagic
Dale Disharoon - Spinnaker
Dan Gorlin - Coleco
Dan Kitchen - Sydney Development
Dan Smith - Coleco
Dave Arneson - Coleco - Game design
Dave Cartt - Atarisoft - Programmer (Jungle Hunt)
Dave Johnson
- Coleco - Art design
Dave Ritchie - Coleco - Game design
Dave Ross - Imagic
David Hwang - Coleco - Programmer
David Schultz - Coleco - Programmer
Deborah Lazarus - Coleco - Art design
Don Mattrick - Sydney
Don McGlauflin - Sierra On-Line
E.F. Dreyer - VSS
Ed English - Nuvatec
Ed Salvo - VSS
Eric Bromley - Coleco - Director of ARD
Eric del Sesto - Mattel
Frank Lam - Coleco - Art design
Frieda Lekkerkerker - Fisher Price
Garry Kitchen - Sydney Development
George Gomez - 4D Interactive Systems
George Kiss - Coleco - Programmer/Director of ARD
James Eisenstein - Atarisoft
Jay Belsky - Coleco - Engineer/programmer/game designer
Jay Fenton - Nuvatec
Jeff Sember - Sydney
Jesse Kapili - Coleco - Art design
Jim Nugent - Coleco - Engineer
Jim Wolf - Nuvatec
Joe Angiolillio - Coleco - Game design
Joe Clark - Nuvatec
John Butterfield - Coleco - Game design
John Hanna - Spinnaker
John Long - Coleco - Technical writer
John Van Ryzin - The Softworks
Juan Sanchez - Coleco - Art design
Karen Elliot - Imagic
Ken Legace - Coleco - Audio programmer
Ken Leonard - Spinnaker
Ken Totten - Coleco - Game design
Kevin Hendryx - Coleco - Game design
Larry Clague - Atarisoft - Programmer
Larry W. Hutcherson - Coleco
Lawrance J. Schick - 4D Interactive Systems - Game Design
Leo Gray - Coleco - Programmer
Marie Degange - Sierra On-Line
Mark Painter - Coleco - Art design
Mark Voorsanger - Imagic
Mary Guth Fulton - Coleco - Lead writer
MaryLou O'Rourke - Sydney Development
Matt Householder - Atarisoft - Programmer (Moon Patrol)
Matthew Hubbard - Action Graphics
Michael Doherty - Coleco - Programmer
Michael P. Price - Coleco - Game design
Micheal Bates - Sydney Development
Michelle van Schouwen - Coleco - Technical writer
Mike Hendricks - Atarisoft - Programmer
Mike Livesay - Micro Fun
Mike Stackpole - Coleco
Nancy Anderson - Sierra On-Line
Paul Jaquays - Coleco - Game Design
Paul Mouchet - Sierra On-Line
Peter Liepa - Micro Fun
Phil Taterczynski - Coleco - Game design
Radia Perlman - Coleco
Rick Banks - Sydney Development
Rick Lay - Coleco
Rob Fulop - Imagic
Rob Harris - Coleco - Programmer/designer
Rob Jepson - Coleco - Programmer
Rob Schenck - Coleco - Programmer
Robert Jaeger - Parker Brothers
Robert Rutkowski - Activision
Robert Smith - Imagic
Robin Lockwood - Coleco - Art design
Roland Rizzo - Coleco - Audio programmer
Rosha Harris - Probe 2000
Stephen Willey - Interphase
Steve Armstrong - Sydney Development
Steve Kitchen - Sydney Development
Steve Roney - Mattel
Thomas Mitchell - Sierra On-Line
Tom Fulton - Coleco - Game design
Tom Helmer - Coleco
Tom Loughry - Telegames
Tom Snyder - Spinnaker
Warren Schwader - Sierra On-Line
Wendell Brown - Imagic
Wilfredo Aguilar - Imagic
Zachary Smith - Coleco - Programmer

 

 

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